Lebanon

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Humanitarian actors join forces to face intense winter storms in January 2019.
  • 2019 Lebanon Crisis Response Plan appeals for US $2.62 billion to assist 3.2 million people in need.
storm Norma
Visiting a Syrian refugee camp in Bar Elias affected by the storm Norma in January 2019.

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Lebanon

Situation Report

Key Figures

1.5M
estimated refugees
948,849
registered refugees
28,800
Palestine Refugees from Syria (PRS)
180,000
Palestine Refugees from Lebanon (PRL)
1.5M
vulnerable Lebanese
4.4M
Total Lebanese population

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Lebanon

Situation Report

Funding

$5.5B
Required
$2.3B
Received
42%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Milena El Murr



Anne-France White



OCHA Lebanon office



Lebanon

Situation Report
Feature
Bar Elias
Children in their boots in a flooded camp in Bar Elias after storm Norma

Winter storms affect 25,000 refugees

Humanitarian actors join forces to respond to harsh winter storms Storms Norma and Myriam hit Lebanon in January 2019, affecting more than 25,600 refugees in 639 informal settlements across the country. Heavy rains, high winds and colder temperatures caused extensive humanitarian needs, with floods, erosions and heavy snow, particularly in the Bekaa. In response, humanitarian partners rapidly assisted around 20,000 people through an extreme weather response coordinated by the interagency with the Ministry of Social Affairs. NGOs, key ministries, UN agencies, municipalities, and governors’ offices joined efforts to provide affected and at-risk people with assistance.

The response was made even more complex because the most vulnerable informal settlements are in floodplains, making the response more difficult. During Humanitarian Coordinator Philippe Lazzarini’s visit to the village of Bar Elias in the Bekaa valley, one of the most impacted informal settlement, Ahmad, a Syrian refugee, told how pumping water out of the tents in the camp was a major challenge and the refugees had to wait until the rain stopped to be able to continue drainage work. Humanitarian partners noted the importance of boosting support to the shelter and WASH sectors, which coordinate preparedness activities that will be essential to mitigate the risks of future storms. Refugees relocated as their tents flooded Tented settlements in several areas of the country were very badly affected by the flooding, leading refugees to have to temporarily move to other camps, schools or mosques. Mahmoud relocated with his family from Houch El Harime in the Bekaa to the URDA camp with 16 other families, after several unsuccessful attempts to evacuate water from the sites where they lived. At the URDA camp, Mahmoud said: “we had to relocate as the water was at knee level. My family lost a lot of its belongings after the water flooded our tent. We were given new mattresses and blankets. At least here it is dry, and my kids can be safe”. However, some refugees preferred to stay in sites that were fully flooded and wait until water levels receded, citing fears of not being able to return later.

After the storm, the team working on the emergency response emphasized that it is critical to reduce the exposure and vulnerability of refugees living in non-permanent structures by relocating flood-prone tents to higher levels and using better quality material resilient to extreme weather. Site improvement are set to be further discussed with relevant municipalities and central authorities, and partners will conduct advocacy with donors to support the interventions.

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Feature
Key results under the 2018 LCRP

2019 Lebanon Crises Response Plan appeals for US $2.62 billion

More than 133 specialized partners will assist 3.2 million people in need

On 31 January 2019, Prime Minister Sad Hariri, together with UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Philippe Lazzarini and previous Minister of Social Affairs Pierre Bou Assi, launched the 2019 update of the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (2017-2020) at the Grand Serail in Beirut.

As the Syria crisis enters its ninth year, the Government of Lebanon and its national and international partners appealed for US$2.62 billion to deliver critical humanitarian assistance and invest in Lebanon’s public infrastructure, services and local economy amid deepening vulnerabilities.

The LCRP brings together more than 133 specialized partners to assist 3.2 million people in need living in Lebanon. It aims at supporting 1.5 million vulnerable Lebanese, 1.5 million Syrian refugees, and more than 208,000 Palestinian refugees. The government of Lebanon, together with UN agencies and local and international NGOs, are working to provide protection and lifesaving assistance to families, while supporting the delivery of public services all over Lebanon.

During the launch, the Humanitarian Coordinator Philippe Lazzarini said: “the LCRP remains the cornerstone of the response for both Syrians and Lebanese. Since the beginning of the Syria crisis, we have mobilized more than 7 billion US dollars. In 2018 alone, we mobilised around 1.2 billion US dollars, covering 45 percent of the appeal – and while we haven’t managed to completely turn the tide, we have at least managed to stop further decline of vulnerabilities.”

On refugee returns, Lazzarini added: “The UN and partners neither prevent nor discourage refugees to return when decisions are free and informed. Refugees have the right to return. It is an individual decision and we respect that. We support families who wish to return by helping them to obtain the key documents that they need to cross the border and reestablish their lives in Syria.”

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Feature
Dabaka

Mapping Localization in Lebanon

A shared commitment to improve efficiency

The Grand Bargain, a shared commitment to improving the efficiency of the humanitarian system and thus better serving people in need, constitutes one of the solutions for an effective and principled humanitarian action, including a series of commitments and changes in the working practices of donors and aid organizations.

In Lebanon, several localization initiatives are being implemented under the Grand Bargain commitments, including providing greater funding for national and local responders, increasing the use of cash-based programming, and producing harmonized and simplified reporting requirements.

Several reports shed light on progress made by donors and aid organizations on their Grand Bargain commitments, but no country-wise assessment or analysis has been conducted in Lebanon to measure progress of the main signatories of the Grand Bargain, more specifically towards Localization.

The Grand Bargain commits donors and aid organizations to providing more support and funding tools for local and national responders, to achieving by 2020 a global, aggregated target of at least 25 per cent of humanitarian funding to local and national responders, as directly as possible, along with more un-earmarked money, and increased multi-year funding to ensure greater predictability and continuity in humanitarian response, among other commitments.

Scope and objective of the Mapping

As part of its commitment to meeting the objectives of the Grand Bargain and engaging with local partners and donors to explore the best means to promote localization in Lebanon, OCHA is undertaking an analysis of progress towards the Grand Bargain Localization commitment on financing local responders, which will establish a baseline of the current initiatives underway.

This mapping is intended to: • Capture and analyze current localization initiatives implemented by INGOs, UN agencies and donors in Lebanon; • Track progress towards the Grand Bargain objectives under workstream 2; • Document country specific achievements and challenges in delivering against the selected Grand Bargain commitments; • Monitor funding percentage going to local partners towards the 25percent commitment.

The hope is that this will ultimately lead, among other outputs, to a better coordination of the localization initiatives, and to help identify challenges and possible ways of addressing the identified gaps in the Lebanese context.

Broadly, the mapping will track the various initiatives under localization which can be divided into: 1) multi-year investment in the institutional capacities of local and national responders, 2) removal of barriers that prevent organizations and donors from partnering with local and national responders, 3) support and complement national coordination mechanisms, and 4) use and apply a “localization” marker to measure direct and indirect funding to local and national responders. The primary data collection will be followed by key informant interviews with donors and INGOS focal points with the purpose of gaining insights on the processes, progress, achievements and challenges in delivering against the Grand Bargain Localization commitments. A baseline report will be presented and will focus on assessing to what extent the Grand Bargain has galvanized efforts to improve humanitarian response; to what extent signatories have acted on their commitments; and to draw an overview of the factors that most enable or hinder progress. More information about OCHA’s Approach on Supporting the Localization of Humanitarian Aid in Lebanon can be found here.

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Visuals and Data
Lebanon Funding

Funding

LCRP activities 52 percent funded As of the end of December 2018, LCRP partners reported a total of US$ 1.4 billion in available resources, including around $1 billion received in 2018 and $312 million carried over from 2017. In total, partners received 52 percent of the funding required to implement activities under the 2018 LCRP.

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Analysis
Funding
2018 Funding mobilization/ Last quarter of 2018 Allocations

Lebanon Humanitarian Fund allocates US$14.5 million in 2018

Funding mobilization for 2018 In 2017, Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Philippe Lazzarini set the fundraising target of US $20 million for the Lebanon Humanitarian Fund in 2018. As part of this, the RC/HC also encouraged donor partners to increase their support for the LHF through multiyear funding to ensure its continuity and provide better visibility for the coming years.

Since the 2017 donor meeting, OCHA received more than 20 million. In 2018 alone, eight donors contributed with a total of $10.6 million: Germany ($2.84 million), Ireland ($2.41 million), Sweden ($1.89 million), Belgium ($1.85 million), Switzerland ($0.5 million), Qatar ($0.5 million), France ($0.36 million) and Iceland ($0.25 million). For 2019, the LHF has carried over $5.3 million, and has already received pledges from Switzerland ($0.5 million) and Qatar ($0.5 million), thanks to multi-year agreements, and another $3.4 is in the pipeline.

Last quarter of 2018: a Standard and a Reserve Allocation

Following the call for proposal issued in October, five Sector Review Committees with Sectors coordinators, UN and NGO representation conducted the Strategic review of 25 projects. A total of 10 projects were selected and approved by the Humanitarian Coordinator for funding (the list of projects is publicly available on the LHF’s Business Intelligence platform, accessible here. After landing on the page, please deselect all countries and select only Lebanon). Following the signature of the Grant Agreements, and ahead of the start of the new projects, the HFU conducted kick-off meetings with all partners to ensure mutual comprehension of expectations throughout the projects’ implementation. In December, the LHF opened its 2018 3rd Reserve Allocation for a total of $4.5 million focusing exclusively on addressing emergency winterization gaps in Shelter and Basic Assistance.

Following consultations with the two targeted sectors, the Reserve Allocation focused on covering remaining Multi-Purpose Cash for 8,837 PRS and 712 PRL SSNP; and weatherproofing/minor repair of non-residential structures within ITS as well as purchase and distribution of 1000 shelter repair and fire prevention kits. The LHF funded 3 projects (2 INGOs and 1 UN Agency).

Overall, the LHF received $10.6 million and allocated $14.5 million to 23 partners to implement 32 projects.

The next Standard Allocation is expected to be launched in March 2019. To stay updated on the latest LHF updates, follow us on Twitter at @LHF_Lebanon.

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Feature
2018 awareness campaign
From the awareness campaign launched in November 2018

Putting an end to child marriage

16 Days of Activism raising awareness on gender inequality in Lebanon

On the global 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence (GBV), between 25 November and 10 December, the Lebanese Presidential Palace and the iconic Baalbek Temple were lit up in orange as part of the “Orange the World initiative”.

The UN in Lebanon and the National Commission for Lebanese Women (NCLW) launched a joint campaign to raise awareness on the consequences and implications of GBV and gender inequality in Lebanon. The main theme of the campaign was around advocating to end child marriage through the adoption of a law to raise the minimum age of marriage to 18 years, as this form of GBV increases girls’ vulnerability and risks to domestic violence including physical, sexual and psychological abuse.

The online campaign with the hashtag #Bakkir3laya ran on UN social media platforms as well as on OCHA Lebanon Facebook page and Twitter account to reaffirm the need to have a law against Child marriage because it prevents children and adolescents from accessing their rights to safety, health, decision making, education, and right to play. In Lebanon, child marriage affects not just Syrian refugees but host communities as well. According to a report by UNICEF in 2016, six per cent of Lebanese women aged 20 to 24 were married by the age of 18. A study conducted by UNFPA, during the same year and covering some 2,400 refugee women and girls living in Western Bekaa, found that more than a third of those surveyed between the ages of 20 and 24 had been married before reaching age 18.

#HearMeToo: Speak up against violence against women and girls

For the same occasion, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) in partnership with the Institute for Women’s Studies in the Arab World (IWSAW) organized a regional arts competition where Arab youth were invited to use the arts to address the theme “#HearMeToo: Speak up against violence against women and girls”. Kourken Papazian, a student at the Lebanese American University won the first prize, producing a 30- second video entitled ‘Covering up’. Through this video, Papazian aimed at sending a clear message to encourage women and girls to speak up and report violence, because it is the only way to tackle the problem. All over the world, around 650 million girls and women got married during their childhood; if measures are not taken soon, by 2030 an additional 150 million girls could suffer from child marriage.

The 16 days of activism Against Gender-Based Violence is an international campaign to challenge and address violence against women and girls launched every year since 1991, from 25 November – the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women - to 10 December – Human Rights Day. Every year, the campaign benefits from those 16 days to increase highlight the importance of ending the violence against women and girls worldwide.

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Lebanon

Situation Report
Feature
Ahmad
Ahmad stands on the pathway Medair paved to ease his way to the latrine. © Medair/Hiba Hajj Omar

Ahmad’s story

Humanitarian actors help people with specific needs to have better lives

In one of the informal settlements of the Bekaa valley lives six-year-old Ahmad with his parents and his five siblings, a brother and four sisters. Ahmad has never felt the sole of his feet touch the ground due to a disability he has had since his early years.

Ahmad’s family came to Lebanon in March 2015 from a rural area to the east of Al-Raqqa region in Syria to seek peace. Jamil, Ahmad’s father, feels nostalgic when thinking of his homeland, he said: “we lived like sultans on our land before the crises. It was never money or power we possessed, it was peace of mind, happiness and the hope to see my beloved kids grow up healthy, happy and educated. Now we have ended up in a tent, trying to work anywhere, doing anything to afford our basic needs.” For the last four years, the family have lived under the roof of a two-room, ten square meter tent. Jamil, his wife and his elder son work in crop farming to survive the stiff winter in Bekaa.

When asked about his son Ahmad, Jamil has a tear in his eye, smiles, raises his hands up to the sky and says, “I wish I could see him walk one day. I have tried my best to make him the most comfortable crutches to suit his small body; I wish I could give him legs instead.” Ahmad, sitting beside Jamil on a carpet on the muddy ground, shows a bright yet shy smile, interrupts his father and utters proudly, “I’m fine,” raising his expressive eyebrows. “Now I can go to the toilet outside on my own and my friends put concrete and tiles all the way to the toilet, the two steps they installed at its entrance helped me a lot; I can climb up and get inside easily.” Inside, a commode chair is helpful when the boy puts the crutches down.

Before this system, the parents and siblings used to carry Ahmad inside, now he is very happy and proud that he can do it himself.

Using the small walking sticks, Ahmad raises himself up, and confidently walks along the paved pathway to show off his experience with the tiles and steps.

Through the support of the UNHCR and the Lebanese Humanitarian Fund, Medair is providing tailored shelter interventions for 1,047people with disabilities and Ahmad is one of the hundreds of survivors served. In addition, Medair refers those people for further assistance and the boy will soon be referred to a physiotherapist through a health team active in seven health clinics across the Bekaa Valley.

About Medair

Medair is a humanitarian organization inspired by Christian faith to relieve human suffering in some of the world’s most remote and devastated places. It works to bring relief and recovery to people in crisis, regardless of race, creed or nationality, providing a range of emergency relief and recovery services in Lebanon.

About the Lebanon Humanitarian Fund

LHF is one of OCHA’s Country Based Pooled Funds (CBPF), established in 2014 following the decentralization of the Regional Syria Fund. Under the overall authority of the Humanitarian Coordinator, it plays a key role in funding urgent humanitarian needs in Lebanon by injecting funding into prioritized and underfunded sectors. find out more at: https://bit.ly/2K0rGQb

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