Afghanistan

Situation Report

Highlights

  • People are frequently forced to endure multiple displacements, reducing their coping and recovery capacities.
  • 36% of IDPs and returnees are diagnosed with life threatening noncommunicable diseases.
  • Floods have had significant and devastating impacts on the fragile education systems
  • Conflict is consistently depriving Afghan children of an education in situations where their schools are occupied or damaged in fighting.
Afghanistan council

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Afghanistan

Situation Report

Key Figures

62K
Internally Displaced People (2019)
96K
Returnees from Iran (2019)
5K
Returnees from Pakistan (2019)

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Afghanistan

Situation Report

Funding

$611.8M
Required
$465.3M
Received
76%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Ian Ridley

Head of Office

Vanessa Curney

Public Information Officer

Afghanistan

Situation Report
Access
Mobile clinic in Afghanistan
Mobile clinic in Afghanistan. Photo: WHO

Health matters: access to health services during displacements

Contributions from WHO and the health cluster in Afghanistan

In 2018, over 380,000 people were displaced from their homes because of conflict. Also last year 800,000 undocumented Afghan people returned home from neighbouring countries. These undocumented returnees face significant difficulties in accessing social services and consequently often experience significant poverty.

Under the basic package of health services (BPHS) in Afghanistan, the whole population, including displaced people, returnees and migrants, are ensured adequate access to essential health services. The BPHS is a strategy for the implementation of primary health care (PHC) which outsources service delivery to NGOs.

Tackling chronic diseases for IDPs and returnees

Some 36 per cent of IDPs and returnees in Afghanistan are diagnosed with life-threatening non-communicable diseases (NCDs). In 2018, the health cluster and its partners began to supply essential medicines and supplies for NCDs as part of the emergency response for IDPs and returnees. The overall response strategy is also strengthening the capacity of frontline workers through new training on how to recognize, assess and treat NCDs.

For more information about the health cluster, please click here.

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Afghanistan

Situation Report
Analysis
Distribution site of non-food items in Kandahar
Distribution site of non-food items in Kandahar; Photo: OCHA

Responding to multiple drivers of displacement

Contributions from IOM, UNICEF, FAO and UNHCR Kandahar, southern Afghanistan, was already a city accommodating many displaced families. Some were displaced by conflict, others by severe drought from various provinces, and some by both. A number of them are returnees from Pakistan. The recent March floods in Kandahar have exacerbated all of these problems and resulted in displacements for a second, possibly a third time for the same people.

Despite the recent floods, however, Kandahar is still a city that can successfully start integrating those who want to return to Afghanistan. For example, IOM works with the Government of Afghanistan, UNICEF, WHO, WFP, UNFPA, DRC and USAID in its Kandahar transit center to provide returnees with social and integration support. It’s a place for the families to rest and receive some cash and food items while preparing to settle in other provinces, and a temporary stopping off point for immediate humanitarian post-arrival help. It hosts the families and provides them with meals, accommodation, health care and psychosocial support, non-food items, and cash for transportation. This all helps them towards reintegrating within Afghanistan.

One of the reasons that 29-year-old Malika and her husband decided to come back to Afghanistan was because of challenges they faced as undocumented refugees in Pakistan. “My children were not allowed to attend government schools in Pakistan. They were only allowed to go to the madrasas to receive religious education” Malika said. She is optimistic about returning to Afghanistan, with high hopes of rebuilding her life in Hilmand. But as Hilmand is one of the country’s most insecure provinces, she doesn’t know what the future holds.

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